KETS named “UK’s Most Innovative Small Cyber Security Company 2018” at Infosec Europe

We were honoured this week to be named winner of the UK’s Most Innovative Small Cyber Security Company of the Year 2018.

After the Semi-final last month, we were one of 13 companies selected to feature in  the UK Cyber Innovation Zone at Infosecurity Europe at London’s Olympia. Infosec is the region’s number one information security event and features Europe’s largest and most comprehensive conference programme with over 400 exhibitors showcasing the most relevant information security solutions and products to 19,500+ information security professionals.

KETS’ co-founder and Technical Head of Sales, Jake Kennard pitched in the final on Wednesday to an expert judging panel including:

– Dave Palmer, Director of Technology, Darktrace
– Nicola Whiting, Chief Strategy Officer, Titania
– Chris Marwood, GM Managed Security Services, BT
– Nazo Moosa, Senior Strategic Partner, Paladin Capital Group
– Gary Brailsford-Hart, Director of Information & CISO, City of London Police

The final was chaired by Martin Chalmers, Managing Director, Aerospace Defence, Security & Technology of competition sponsors, SNC Lavalin Atkins. Competition was tight and the judges took some time to deliver their final decision.

After receiving the award, Jake said, “Being recognised as the UK’s most innovative small cyber security company amongst such strong competition is a real honour and testament to all the hard work that our team has put in to KETS.”

KETS’ CEO and co-founder, Chris Erven, who was there to support Jake in the final added, “We didn’t expect this at all, the competition from the other finalists was really strong and all the pitches were excellent. We’re very excited about 2018 and bringing KETS’ technology to the market; none of which would be possible without the support of DCMS and the Academic Cyber Start-ups Programme. As a bonus, in Jake’s next career he’s going to be a model; he was excellent at taking photographic direction!”

 

 

What does quantum computing mean for the world’s best security systems?

Quantum computers are on the rise, with increasing numbers of well-funded start-ups (e.g. Regetti), big businesses (like Intel, Google, and Microsoft) significantly investing in to development, and bigger breakthroughs at an increasingly faster rate.

The world of information security should be taking notice as current public key cryptography is in danger. Efficient quantum algorithms are known to crack the underlying problems behind RSA and elliptic curve, and, as highlighted in the Times this past week, this problem is becoming more mainstream than ever before. In a surprising move a little over a year ago, the US NSA declared that the algorithms it had insisted were the best way to lock up secret data just weren’t safe anymore; no longer recommending a change to elliptic curve, but instead, preparation for quantum resistant algorithms.

KETS CTO, Philip Sibson commented: “Post-Quantum algorithms are analogous to modern public key crypto, but instead of finding mathematical problems that are not only hard for a classical computer to solve, they must also be inefficient for a quantum computers as well. This approach will certainly be adopted for many security applications, but with quantum computers in their infancy and much still to be understood about their computational power, these techniques suffer from greater uncertainty about their claims of security, with many proposed solutions being retracted after efficient algorithms are found to crack them (e.g. GCHQ’s Soliloquy public-key cryptosystem).

Quantum resistant security, doesn’t just have to be software, and can benefit from our hardware based technologies. Quantum random numbers can strengthen algorithmic security, providing a solid foundation from truly random and unpredictable numbers and quantum key distribution (QKD) can share the most secure symmetric digital keys for security protocols like encryption. We are using the properties of quantum mechanics to fight the threats that quantum technologies pose.”

This step towards improved levels of security is crucial in the coming years. Quantum computers are coming, and purport to break our current encryption with ease. Critical infrastructure, industrial IoT, and network security are under greater and greater stress to provide robust and reliable services.

Contact us today (enquiry@kets-quantum.com) to find out more about our technology and the solutions we can provide to counter the quantum computers of the near future.